Mira Cantor

  • Mira Cantor

    Promiseland (catalog cover)

    Promiseland Catalog Cover
  • Mira Cantor

    Promiseland, Canvas, acrylic paint, Goodwill clothing, yarn, miscellaneous, life-size and dimensions variable, 1978-2018.

    Promiseland Installation View
  • Mira Cantor

    Promiseland, Canvas, acrylic paint, Goodwill clothing, yarn, miscellaneous, life-size and dimensions variable, 1978-2018.

    Promiseland Installation View
  • Mira Cantor

    Promiseland, Canvas, acrylic paint, Goodwill clothing, yarn, miscellaneous, life-size and dimensions variable, 1978-2018.

    Promiseland Installation View
  • Mira Cantor

    Promiseland, Canvas, acrylic paint, Goodwill clothing, yarn, miscellaneous, life-size and dimensions variable, 1978-2018.

    Promiseland Installation View
  • Mira Cantor

    Drawings of Police and Women, charcoal and acrylic on paper, 48 x 90 inches, 2009-2015.

    Drawings of Police and Women
  • Mira Cantor

    Drawings of Police and Women, charcoal and acrylic on paper, 48 x 90 inches, 2009-2015.

    Drawings of Police and Women
  • Mira Cantor

    Drawings of Police and Women, charcoal and acrylic on paper, 48 x 90 inches, 2009-2015.

    Drawings of Police and Women

Artist Statement

Promiseland: an installation with sculptures and drawings; a metaphor for hope.

Growing up in New York in the 1950's, I lived in a culture of separation within a melting pot of its citizens. New Yorkers talked about where they lived in directions, and everyone knew what that meant. South Bronx, West Bronx, East Bronx, Bensonhurst, Red Hook, Brooklyn Heights, East Side, West Side, Harlem. Only if you were a New Yorker did you truly understand those neighborhoods. Schools were positioned across neighborhoods, resulting in integrated schools. I went to a high school with 5,000 students. It was integrated, yet segregated. Those students going to college were separated from those who were not. As a result, my classes in high school were mostly white . I can still remember my pledges of allegiance to the American Flag "with liberty and justice for all" as a routine event in school every day as a child. I felt proud of the American Flag.

My father served in WW II and soon after, the beginnings of prosperity would occur. My father worked in Harlem and he was the only white man from his company who would volunteer to work in that black neighborhood. He worked there all his life. I grew up on a white block; the following street was black. My street, my building, my friends were white . I played there, I rode my bike there, and never crossed the street to the black block. This went on until I was old enough to use public transportation myself.

The public transportation system of New York was the element in the city that integrated people. This underground system was key to the understanding of fairness in New York City. Everyone got to work the same way. It bridged barriers and let us as citizens look at each other. This was way before cell phones. People of all races sat and stood next to each other. At this time, tensions in the south were escalating. George Wallace, the Ku Klux Klan and lynchings brought outright killing of black people. When I was in college, president JFK was killed (the first president I voted for who would be 100 years old this year); then Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy were killed--and the streets exploded all over the USA. As a kid, I watched the parades go by for Memorial Day and Independence Day. There was meaning for citizens in this country although the racial disparity was evident and palpable, unfair and uncomfortable for me. I knew you couldn't say "justice for all" and only have it applied to some people. Although some of us fight against unequal justice and do something about it, it pervades the psyche of individuals who truly believe that the other should not enjoy basic freedoms that are inherent in our Constitution. There is a moral obligation to be fair and just whether you like it or not. Racial bias is not an option.

Artist Bio

Mira Cantor received a BFA from the University of Buffalo and an MFA from the University of Illinois-Champaign-Urbana. Both degrees are in painting and drawing. Her work is in many collections in the US and abroad including The Contemporary Arts Center, Honolulu, The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, The Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University, Simmons College Collection, The Danforth Museum to name a few. She has shown her work at the Venice Biennale, Biennales in Norway and Yugoslavia, The Tokyo American Center, The Cultural Center in Alexandria Egypt, Gallery Lohrl in Germany, The Genovese Sullivan Gallery in Boston, The De Cordova Museum in Boston. She has been a member of the Kingston Gallery since 2013 and will have her second solo exhibition there in October 2016. Mira Cantor has taught art her entire career. She was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Visual Studies at MIT from 1978-80 where she taught drawing in the School of Architecture. She also received a Fulbright to Egypt in 1994 to teach at the University of Alexandria. At present she is a Professor of Art at Northeastern University in Boston where she has been teaching for 25 years.

Exhibitions

Promiseland, October 31-December 2, 2018
Inundated, October 5-30, 2016
I Know Just What You're Saying, January 6-31, 2016
Mira Cantor en plein aire drawings, 2013, November 5-30, 2014
Ground Cover: Contemporary Abstraction between Figure and Ground, curated by William Kaizen, September 3-28, 2014
Meltwater, December 4-December 29, 2013

Press + Media

Martin, Nat. "Discussing the Promiseland," Kingston Blog, December 4, 2018.
Allara, Pamela. "Thoughts on Promiseland," Kingston Blog, November 27, 2018.
"Mira Cantor: Promiseland and Judith Brassard Brown: Dreams Within," Kingston Blog, November 5, 2018.
"Mira Cantor's Promiseland," The Improper Bostonian, November 1, 2018.
"Promiseland and political upheaval." September 20, 2018.
"Erratics at Kingston Gallery: Mira Cantor." Take Magazine, November 2017.
McQuaid, Cate, "Mira Cantor: Inundated." The Boston Globe, Art: Galleries, October 19, 2016.
Billman, Glenn, "NU Professor Debuts New Gallery Exhibit." The Huntington News, October 13, 2016.
McQuaid, Cate, "Icy Truths." The Boston Globe, Theatre & art, December 17, 2013.
Davidson, Deborah, "Contradictlng Beauty." Thinking About Art Out Loud, December 16, 2013.
Richardson, Milda, "'What is Athabasca?' Paintings by Mira Cantor at Kingston Gallery." Big Red and Shiny, December 13, 2013.
Brown, Linda Leslie, "NEW Gallery Members at Kingston." Thinking About Art Out Loud, September 25, 2013.
"Sophia Ainslie and Mira Cantor at Northeastern University." Thinking About Art Out Loud, April 12, 2013.

Contact

www.miracantor.net




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