2014 Exhibitions


December 3-28, 2014
First Friday Opening Reception
: Friday, December 5, 2014, 5:30-8:00 pm

Stacey Alickman: Humpty Dumpty

For the past several years, Stacey Alickman's practice has been to layer oil paint over extended periods of time, often applying and then removing it. At some point, the physical aspect of the paint asserts itself and she no longer controls the outcome. "The paint wills itself into a composition that is not about my ideas but something hopefully more transcendent. Lately, I am simply more open to the possibility of not knowing what the work is about until the surface has been broken over and over again. The reemergence of the surface is a process of putting back together, with nothing coming back together right. A painting I can live with is one whose results couldn't have happened in any other way." The exhibit title, Humpty Dumpty, is a reference to her way of working.

This exhibit shows Alickman exploring nuanced kinds of textures, not just impasto and ridges but something else, something that also expresses the perception of texture. She finds new inspiration by sanding through layers of paint, building up new shapes while allowing previous layers to re-appear. She fearlessly develops her paintings for the purpose of 'breaking' them, that is, to get the paint off its canvas. Once the paint is free of its support, she uses both the back and front of these chips; they become the raw material for what will become future bodies of work.

Stacey Alickman, Flim Flam

Stacey Alickman, Flim Flam, Oil on canvas, 61 x 61 inches, 2012.

Stacey Alickman, Lost Year

Stacey Alickman, Lost Year, Oil on canvas, 48 x 42 inches, 2014.


December 3-28, 2014
First Friday Opening Reception
: Friday, December 5, 2014, 5:30-8:00 pm

Rhonda Smith: And There Was Matter

Rhonda Smith's paintings are satellite-like views of the motion of the phenomenal world, seen through its underlying material: microbial movement, atomic, tectonic, planetary, migratory, and tidal. The mystery of the seen and the unseen act together in wildly diverse scales of time and space. Smith is fascinated by the constant exchange, the idea of disruption, of always being on the cusp of chaos. This becomes for her both expression and process.

"My daily perspective of my physical environment is narrow: I perceive it as solid, stable, and visible. My sense of time is personal. How to integrate what I know otherwise of a parallel and more compelling dynamic world? This 'other' unseen world consists of constant movement on scales ranging from nano to tectonic to astral, a series of continual and accumulating actions and reactions. Likewise the rates of speed from atomic to glacial are difficult to comprehend."

As the artist tries to understand more of this unseen world in her paintings and drawings, her sense of connection to it expands. Sometimes she can imagine our origin from starry matter, the long line from the Big Bang to the genesis of the earth and us. A feeling of wonder and relationship emerges, displacing her otherwise egocentric view.

Rhonda Smith, Electron Madness III

Rhonda Smith, Electron Madness lll Then and Now, Oil on panel, 46 x 76 inches, 2014

Rhonda Smith, Two Seconds After

Rhonda Smith, Two Seconds After, Liquid graphite, ink and gouache on paper, 8.75 x 22 inches, 2014.

Rhonda Smith, Brainwave

Rhonda Smith, Brainwave, Liquid graphite, ink and gouache on paper, 15 x 13 inches, 2014.


December 3-28, 2014
First Friday Opening Reception
: Friday, December 5, 2014, 5:30-8:00 pm

ROSE OLSON: Keeping It Together

Rose Olson, Nightforest

Rose Olson, Nightforest @ Bay, Acrylic on maple veneer, 10 x 10 x 2 inches, 2014.

Rose Olson, Nightforest

Rose Olson, Column (left) and Deep (right), Acrylic on maple veneer, 8 x 8 x 2 inches each, 2014.


November 5 - 30, 2014
First Friday Opening Reception:
Friday, November 7, 2014, 5:30-8:00 pm
Artist Gallery Talk: Saturday, November 29, 2014, 4:00 pm

Gazing Into Space - New photographs by Mary Lang

For more than forty years, Mary Lang has adhered to the discipline of straight photography. Her work has always been about looking and seeing, using the frame to capture the moment of perception. As a photographer, Lang is rooted in the phenomenal world, yet her subject matter is not so much the physical places in front of her lens, but rather the emotional and elemental quality of the space itself. Sometimes gazing into space can feel like falling off a cliff, losing your sense of self, losing solid ground.

Lang's work has long been informed by her Buddhist meditation practice. The space in these photographs, from the Urubamba River Valley in Peru to tidal flats in the Bay of Fundy, from a hillside in Vermont to a model railroad landscape in San Diego, CA, is not only vast geographic space of mountaintops or shorelines; it is the intimate space gazing out a car window or the atmospheric space of early morning fog. It is the contemplative inner space of a quiet ordinary moment, the space between the in breath and the out breath, a gap full of loneliness and possibility.

Mary Lang, Urubamba River Valley from the train window, Peru, 2013

Mary Lang, Urubamba River Valley from the train window, Peru, 2013, Archival pigment print, 20x30 inches.

Mary Lang, The last morning at Karmê Chöling, June 2014

Mary Lang, The last morning at Karmê Chöling, June 2014, Archival pigment print, 20 x 30 inches.

Mary Lang, Train landscape, Model Train Museum, Balboa Park, San Diego, CA, 2013

Mary Lang, Train landscape, Model Train Museum, Balboa Park, San Diego, CA, 2013, Archival pigment print, 20 x 30 inches.


November 5 - 30, 2014
First Friday Opening Reception:
Friday, November 7, 2014, 5:30-8:00 pm

Mira Cantor

en plein aire

drawings, 2013

Drawing is crucial to my practice. It is the way I start thinking about ideas. After my last exhibition of paintings at the Kingston Gallery called "meltwater," I thought it would be valuable to show my thinking process before those paintings were made. These drawings were done directly from my physical presence in the landscape in Banff, Canada; en plein aire. I would walk or drive to different locations and make notations. There are about 100 sketches (6 x 8 inches) in this group. Thirty will be shown.

Mira Cantor, drawing

Mira Cantor, Sketchbook drawing from Banff, Pencil on paper, 6 x 8 inches, 2013.

Mira Cantor, Drawing

Mira Cantor, Sketchbook drawing from Banff, Pencil on paper, 6 x 8 inches, 2013.

Mira Cantor, Drawing'

Mira Cantor, Sketchbook drawing from Banff, Pencil on paper, 8 x 6 inches, 2013.


October 1 - November 2, 2014
First Friday Opening Reception: Friday, October 3, 2014, 5:30-7:30 pm
Artists' Reception: Saturday, October 25, 3:00-5:00 pm

Susan Alport: There for the Taking

I like looking at refined products and polished pieces of other artists. But my own work is motivated by a different quest: how to capture those unplanned and unedited visual encounters on the street, in a room, on an alley wall when I spot, as if by accident, the exact confluence of all the elements that constitute what's beautiful to me, what I would make myself, except it's already made, out in the world, there for the taking. I want to hold that combination for perpetuity, to capture with camera, drawing, word, or phrase the entire visual entity before the light shifts or I change positions, and what I would have made is gone.

In those fractions of a second, everything's in flux: the fugitive image, my fumbling hands, an enveloping cloud overhead. To remember the visual instant, get it down, and bring it home as visually intact as possible is the essence of my work.

The discovered images, objects, and text are later incorporated into pre-existing work, reconfigured and collaged into new pieces, or simply preserved in their appropriated state to serve as Muses, models, and catalysts for my studio practice.

This installation reflects how that practice feels and looks. Collected detritus, new photographs, current and previous drafts of artist statements and other materials, united by one sense of flux, hold together here in a shared temporality.

Susan Alport, "There No. 1"

Susan Alport, Here/There #1, 35mm film print, 6 x 4 inches, 2014.

Susan Alport, "There No. 2"

Susan Alport, Here/There #2, 35mm film print, 6 x 4 inches, 2014.

Susan Alport, "There No. 3"

Susan Alport, Here/There #3, 35mm film print, 6 x 4 inches, 2014.


October 1 - November 2, 2014
First Friday Opening Reception: Friday, October 3, 2014, 5:30-7:30 pm
Artists' Reception: Saturday, October 25, 3:00-5:00 pm

Eugene La Rochelle:

 

(I Love You)

Exploring uncomfortable questions prompted by the American experience primarily centers on group identity and the pain one feels when one "doesn't belong". These experiences themselves are categorized into relatively rigid groups, ironically reflecting the same suffocating binary identities they intend to describe: the biracial experience; the queer experience in a hetero-normative culture, etc. I find myself at the intersection of multiple experiences. In addition to being biracial and queer, I come from a military family that moved from base to base, born in a foreign country that is a liberal democracy but growing up in another that is a conservative theocracy. My personal history provides me not just with a vein of material to mine, but I believe gives me a nuanced understanding of the origins of pain that may rise from these incompatible and intersecting experiences, which I have had to curate and manage at great expense my entire life.

My aim as an artist, then, is to create work that frames and provides a window into conversations on pain and conflict, allowing the observer to eavesdrop and gain an intimate, even invasive view of the private lives, quarrels and pain of others. Though the audience may feel discomfort at being caught in the crossfire of private conflicts, I hope the work will provide catharsis and promote discussion, revealing the personal cost of leaving pain unresolved and undiscussed.

Eugene La Rochelle, Denial #1

Eugene La Rochelle, Denial #1, Silkscreen Print , 22 x 14.75 inches, 2014.

Eugene La Rochelle, Denial #6

Eugene La Rochelle, Denial #6, Silkscreen Print, 22 x 14.75 inches, 2014.

Eugene La Rochelle, Denial #7

Eugene La Rochelle, Denial #7, Silkscreen Print, 22 x 14.75 inches, 2014.


October 1 - November 2, 2014
First Friday Opening Reception: Friday, October 3, 2014, 5:30-7:30 pm
Artists' Reception: Saturday, October 25, 3:00-5:00 pm

Elif Soyer: New Work

The inner life of biological entities has been a story that I cannot seem to get away from when I work in two dimensions. I find myself lost in their layered universes and hope to bring the viewer with me into these reveries.

Elif Soyer, Origin

Elif Soyer, Origin, Mixed media on paper, 18 x 18 inches, 2014.


September 3-28, 2014
First Friday Opening Reception: Friday, September 5, 2014, 5:30-7:30 pm

Second Saturday Event: Saturday, September 13, 2014, 4:00-5:00 pm, "Abstraction and Contemporary Art" Curator William Kaizen in conversation with Peter Kalb, Brandeis University and Martha Buskirk, Monsterrat College of Art

South End Open Studios: Saturday & Sunday, September 20-21, 2014, 11:00 am-6:00 pm

Ground Cover: Contemporary Abstraction between Figure and Ground,

curated by William Kaizen, Assistant Professor of Art History and Visual Studies, Northeastern University

Dancing between thing and nothing, event and non-event, appearance and disappearance, the works in Ground Cover transmute ground into figure and figure into ground. These works operate at the limits of porosity, stressing the indeterminacy of figures and grounds. A fundamental problem for any visual artist is how to cover the ground on which she works. For painters concerned primarily with two-dimensional form, this problem ranges from issues related to stretching, priming and layering to the construction, or not, of illusory depth. For painters and sculptors concerned with three-dimensional form, this it extends to the relationship between the work and its environment, as the work's various parts obscure or reveal patches of space. Issues related to figure/ground only intensified with the advent of Abstraction, as the veil of naturalistic illusion fell away. No issue has been addressed more consistently in abstract art and it remains perennially of interest to artists.

For the artists in the exhibition, the idea of ground cover signals the risk of their work sliding into a banal, if not dissolute, state of nothingness that simply recapitulates the all-ground of the monochrome. By capturing a primeval "becoming" that touches on states of passing into and out of existence, ground cover also offers the possibility of capturing the oceanic pleasures and terrors of spaces between figure and ground. Translated into works of art, the problem of how to cover or reveal one's ground in order to capture this in-between state encompasses additional issues such as how to size wood and canvas, how to coat and drape, how to swathe, trowel or smother. It also includes subtractive processes like sanding, abrasion, gouging, and scraping. Whether they emphasize upward growth or downward erosion (or both simultaneously), the works in Ground Cover treat the limen between figure and ground as an existential surface whose crossing marks a porous border between one thing and another.

Artists: Stacey Alickman, Linda Leslie Brown, Mary Bucci McCoy, Mira Cantor, Julie Graham, Jennifer Moses, Rose Olson, Lynda Schlosberg

Curator: William Kaizen is Assistant Professor of Art History and Visual Studies at Northeastern University. His current research focuses on art, populism and new media. His writing has appeared in Bomb, Art Papers, October, Grey Room, TextezurKunst, Artforum and elsewhere.

Mary Bucci McCoy, "Viriditas"

Mary Bucci McCoy, Viriditas, Acrylic on plywood , 9 x 6 x 1 inches, 2013.


July 30 - August 29, 2014
Opening Reception:
Friday, August 1, 2014, 5:30-7:30 pm
Artist Talk: Sunday, August 10, 2014, 1:00 – 3:00 pm

Kingston Associates Annual Exhibition: Free Association: 2014

Kingston Associates

The Kingston Gallery Associates is a group of ten artists, juried by the membership to expand the Gallery's contact with artists and to encourage new art. This will be their fifth annual group summer exhibition. Their work represents a wide range of interests, themes, and processes. The Kingston Gallery is delighted to have them exhibit their work as a group and to connect with the Boston arts community. Pictured below is a work by Kingston Associate member Shawn Salinger.

Artists: Jamie Bowman, Susan Emmerson, Conny Goelz-Schmitt, Jeanne Griffin, David Kinsey, Erica Licea-Kane, Peggy McClure, Shawn Salinger, Ellen Solari, Rachel Thern.

Shawn Salinger, Hang Around Sundown

Shawn Salinger, Hang Around Sundown, Acrylic and spray paint on canvas, 46 x 40 inches, 2013


July 2 - 27, 2014
Opening Reception:
Friday, July 11, 2014, 5:30-8:00 pm

Lynda Schlosberg: Zero Point Field

Schlosberg's new works present themselves as self-generating macrocosms that embrace the simultaneous presence and absence of all possibilities.

In these paintings Schlosberg meditates on the philosophy that nothing ever dies and that everything is connected through a never-ending unified field of energy. Our perception of reality emerges from this field and it is through our focused attention that we bring things into form. Since we get to freely choose what we want to see, there is infinite potential to create any reality we desire. One only needs to look.

In a quantum world the Zero Point Field is an omnipresent energetic substructure. It is the lowest possible energy state where all matter has been removed and no particle movement should remain. Yet no particle ever comes completely to rest, every particle is forever in motion due to an endless ground-state field of energy that continually interacts with all subatomic matter. What this means is that the Zero Point Field becomes a mirror image and record of everything that is and ever was. In a sense, it is the beginning and the end of everything in the universe, a basis of oneness.

Schlosberg's process-oriented paintings are built one layer at a time, one color at a time. Organic backgrounds of pooled color are superimposed with solid, amorphous forms that are covered with thousands of small dots, dashes and circles. Her choice of colors and geometric patterns conform to self-determined rules that are driven by, and are in response to, the preceding layers. It is through the mass accumulation and combination of individual marks, and the process of weaving the layers together, that larger patterns emerge and dissipate. Each work is a sea of oscillating particles, a formless state of swirling energy, out of which its own unique sense of potential becomes manifest.

Lynda Schlosberg, Into the Vortex

Lynda Schlosberg, Into the Vortex, Acrylic on paper, 55 x 55 inches, 2014.

Lynda Schlosberg, Subatomic Flux

Lynda Schlosberg, Subatomic Flux, Acrylic on panel, 36 x 36 inches, 2014.

Lynda Schlosberg, Blending Frequencies

Lynda Schlosberg, Blending Frequencies, Acrylic on panel, 30 x 30 inches, 2014.


July 2 - 27, 2014
Opening Reception:
Friday, July 11, 2014, 5:30-8:00 pm

Peggy McClure: A Sense of Place

The idea of entropy has intrigued McClure for years. She grew up in a quiet, leafy suburb that had both open countryside and steel mills within a short driving distance and she has long been fascinated by that dichotomy: the noise of the declining mills versus the peace and quiet of nature, and by the transformations that take place in both of these environments. She is attracted to rust and fragments, to the patinas and the altering of shapes that occur with deterioration.

In photographing ordinary places, Peggy McClure looks for relationships and incongruities, and the intersections of form or content. Formal issues such as color and line, as well as a bit of whimsy are the artist's guides as she arranges photographs of places altered by time and activity. In dealing with her subject, McClure is interested in both embracing the landscape, as well as the search for the order of things, that is, a metaphysical sense of place in the natural and man-made worlds, both of which are constantly changing.

Peggy McClure, Cache of Fire

Peggy McClure, Cache of Fire, Archival Digital Print, 17.5 x 17.5 inches, 2013.

Peggy McClure, A Gate, the Leaves, the Flash of a Whitetail

Peggy McClure, A Gate, the Leaves, the Flash of a Whitetail, Archival Digital Print, 17.5 x 17.5 inches, 2014.

Peggy McClure, Tidal Pool

Peggy McClure, Tidal Pool, Archival Digital Print, 17.5 x 17.5 inches, 2014.


July 2 - 27, 2014
Opening Reception:
Friday, July 11, 2014, 5:30-8:00 pm

Ilona Anderson: Home Land

Exploration of internal, external
place, space
outside inside?
Back and forth between time and place,
Between South Africa, and America
All integrated, part of the whole
Exists in the imagination.
Imagination, linking past, present, maybe future
All we really know is now.
Home.
The dot in space.

I am  a Buddhist, a South African and someone who lives in America, I feel my space between these areas.

I ask: How do we negotiate these spaces, this dot in space.

Ilona Anderson, Home Land 1

Ilona Anderson, Home Land 1, Gouache, and Lascaux Acrylics, 27 x 40 inches, 2013-2014.

Ilona Anderson, Home Land 2

Ilona Anderson, Home Land 2, Gouache, and Lascaux Acrylics, 27 x 40 inches, 2013-2014.

Ilona Anderson, Home Land 3

Ilona Anderson, Home Land 3, Gouache, and Lascaux Acrylics, 27 x 40 inches, 2013-2014.


June 1 - 29, 2014
Opening Reception:
Friday, June 6, 2014, 5:00-7:30 pm

Barbara Moody: Escape

Moody's new large scale drawings bring the wildness of the landscape indoors by contrasting expressive organic forms with geometric interior walls. The walls can barely hold the exuberance of the marks, creating an exciting visual tension. The landscape elements burst from the confines of the small rectangular corners, creating sharp contrasts between static and dynamic, simple and complex, calm and frenetic. Here, the landscape cannot be captured or tamed into submission; rather, it overcomes human attempts to control and contain it.

The artist's previous bodies of work included room interiors and complicated overlapping branches and roots. In the new works, these seemingly opposing ideas come together for the first time. Moody wrestled with a series of paintings in which landscape and rectangle fought for dominance, coexisting on the canvas in uneasy harmony. Several of these transitional works are also included in the exhibition. But once the artist shifted the ratio of larger organic forms to smaller corners of the room, it became clear that the organic forms took over, subjugating the human construction of the room to a minor but still important role.

Almost 5 x 8 feet in size, these drawings combine acrylic squeegee and drip techniques with pastel and charcoal mark making. The result is a dynamic visual feast of rich textures that show Moody's extensive range of skill and personal involvement with drawing.

Barbar Moody, Can't Catch Me

Barbara Moody, Tremor, Acrylic and pastel on paper, 52 x 96 inches, 2014.

Barbara Moody, Gate

Barbara Moody, Gate, Ink and charcoal on paper, 45 x 60 inches, 2014.

Barbara Moody, Escape

Barbara Moody, Escape, Ink and charcoal on paper, 45 x 60 inches, 2014


June 1 - 29, 2014
Opening Reception:
Friday, June 6, 2014, 5:00-7:30 pm

Sharon Pierce: New Work

Sharon Pierce

Sharon Pierce, Untitled, Mixed Media, 2014.

Sharon Pierce

Sharon Pierce, Untitled, Mixed Media, 2014.


April 30 - June 1, 2014
Opening Reception:
Friday, May 2, 2014, 5:00-7:30 pm
Closing Reception: Sunday, June 1, 2014, 3:00 - 5:00 pm

Joan Baldwin: Out and About + Cocoons

Joan Baldwin's surrealistic landscape paintings depict a range of locales on Cape Cod, where people are getting out and blending into the landscape. They are but one part of the natural world, along with myriad other living creatures. The images reveal both pleasant discoveries and also dangers lurking in and around the Cape waters. In her landscapes the sense of size and space is disorienting and one's judgment of personal safety is often inaccurate.

The exhibition consists of two parts: in the Main Gallery are large oil paintings on canvas and smaller oil paintings on boards in terrarium-style containers with found objects. All the paintings include people near to or in the Cape Cod waters. Occupying the Center Gallery is an accompanying installation of embryonic humans developing in cocoons dangling from the ceiling, coming to life in the manner of insects. It reiterates the theme of the connection between humans and nature as well as symbolizes the stages of our personal development.

Joan Baldwin, Tidal Flow

Joan Baldwin, Tidal Flow, Oil on canvas, 40 x 52 inches, 2013.

Joan Baldwin, Diving Deep

Joan Baldwin, Diving Deep, Oil on canvas, 40 x 52 inches, 2013.

Joan Baldwin, Foggy Morning

Joan Baldwin, Foggy Morning, Oil on canvas, 67 x 47 inches, 2014.


April 30 - June 1, 2014
Opening Reception:
Friday, May 2, 2014, 5:00-7:30 pm
Closing Reception: Sunday, June 1, 2014, 3:00 - 5:00 pm

Stacey Alickman: my funny hat

This series of drawings originated from a lone and improvisational drawing called "my funny hat." Its premise became a context for constructing different kinds of hats with different formal solutions. Many of the ideas for this series took place away from the drawing table. Each potential germ was collected in a notebook. The most promising of possible hat titles and constructions were worked out and practiced on scrap paper. When I had developed enough information about what the hat was about and what it might look like, I then made the drawing in its entirety.

Stacey Alickman, Paul Monette

Stacey Alickman, Paul Monette, Gouache on paper, 16.5 x 18 inches, 2010.

Stacey Alickman, Festive Chicken

Stacey Alickman, Festive Chicken, Gouache on paper, 18 x 16.5 inches, 2011.

Stacey Alickman, Scared Medusa

Stacey Alickman, Scared Medusa , Gouache on paper, 16.5 x 18 inches, 2011.


April 2-27, 2014
Opening Reception:
Friday, April 4, 2014, 5:30-8:00 pm

Mary Bucci McCoy: New Paintings

Mary Bucci McCoy's intimate abstract acrylic paintings reconcile intention and acceptance, action and stillness, object and image, and conceptual rigor and intuitive process through a poetic material language that negotiates and exploits the opportunities and exigencies of her chosen medium. The work synthesizes oblique references to the body and the landscape on both macro and micro levels through form, color, and material.

Bucci McCoy's work is increasingly informed by her early experience with the materials, processes, and techniques of ceramic sculpture: from a process of building paintings over a period of time by the deliberate situating of painted marks on a monochromatic ground, she has gradually expanded her practice to include working in a very immediate, improvisational way, with the possibility of an entire painting occurring simultaneously in the still-liquid matrix of the ground.

Bucci McCoy's paintings resist reduction to a single image, requiring the viewer's presence and time to be fully seen, and valuing the interior rather than exterior scale of the viewer's experience. She cites a diverse range of influences for the work in this exhibition, including the work of composer/artist John Cage, choreographer Deborah Hay, sound artist Bill Fontana, as well as traditional Japanese ceramics, artifacts from the ancient territory of Safinim in south central Italy, and the experience of hiking through West Coast volcanic landscapes.

Mary Bucci McCoy, In Green

Mary Bucci McCoy, In Green, Acrylic on panel, 10.5 x 8.5 x 1 inches, 2013.

Mary Bucci McCoy, Crux

Mary Bucci McCoy, Crux, Acrylic mixed media on plywood, 9 x 7 x 1 inches, 2013.

Mary Bucci McCoy, Lacuna

Mary Bucci McCoy, Lacuna, Acrylic mixed media on panel, 10.5 x 8.5 x 1 inches, 2013.


April 2-27, 2014
Opening Reception:
Friday, April 4, 2014, 5:30-8:00 pm

Linda Leslie Brown: New Work (with Holes)

Linda Leslie Brown's new works seem to be the product of teleonomic mania. Postapocalyptic Pompeiian lumps, porous and eroded, these objects present undulating masses colliding and melting together with aortic holes penetrating into the core. Brown's works are rife with allusions to the body. At the same time they suggest the plastic, provisional, and uncertain world of a new and transgenic nature, where corporeal and mechanical entities recombine.

Linda Leslie Brown, Co-Host

Linda Leslie Brown, Co-Host, Ceramic, metal, plastic, paper clay, 13 x 9 x 9 inches, 2013.


March 5-30, 2014,
First Friday Opening Reception:
Friday, March 7, 2014, 5:00-8:00 pm

Ann Wessmann: Memento

Known for her use of wall reliefs and site-specific installation, Wessmann has explored time, memory, loss and the fragility and strength of life through collections of natural materials, mainly plant based, and gifts of hair from family members and friends. She has continued to collect natural objects and delights in observing and finding beauty in the ephemeral. The new work, while expanding on these themes, also commemorates place and time.

Ann Wessmann, Enduring Ephemera Series: Installation #2, detail

Ann Wessmann, Enduring Ephemera Series: Installation #2, detail, Mixed media, plant/animal material, hair, Dimensions: variable, 2014.

Ann Wessmann, Enduring Ephemera Series: Installation #2, detail

Ann Wessmann, Enduring Ephemera Series: Installation #2, detail , Mixed media, plant/animal material, hair , Dimensions: variable, 2014.


March 5-30, 2014,
First Friday Opening Reception:
Friday, March 7, 2014, 5:00-8:00 pm

Erica Wessmann: HUNGER

Through a series of sculptural works, Wessmann takes us on a journey through the streets of New York City drawing out an imbedded history of violence, classicism, AIDS and our deep-seated cultural alienation of the body.

Erica Wessmann, Pathway

Erica Wessmann, Pathway, Blood and concrete, 36 3/8 x 17 x 2 inches, 2014.


March 5-30, 2014,
First Friday Opening Reception:
Friday, March 7, 2014, 5:00-8:00 pm

Julie S Graham: OUTSKIRTS

I am drawn to vernacular architecture, that which is unplanned and that which is built with humble materials. I'm interested sociologically and aesthetically in unexpected collisions of forms, materials and colors, those views and situations that are normally overlooked or hidden. In this work I am exploring juxtapositions that are perfectly imperfect, and framing it within a larger conversation about my relationship with painting.

Julie S Graham, Trap

Julie S Graham, Trap, Mixed Media, 6 x 8 x 3 inches, 2013.


February 5 - March 2, 2014
First Friday Opening Reception:
Friday, February 7, 2014, 5:00-7:30 pm

Jennifer Moses

: The Black and White of Things

The Black and White of Things is an exhibition that represents formal and conceptual artistic choices. The paintings attempt to reconcile the visual influences of an urban environment with the monumental rock faces and vast landscape of New Mexico. The cartooned and animated abstract images reflect the end point of a series of choices and possibilities. Often the images are blocked with shapes and revealed by the excavation of past decisions. The work tells tragicomic tales of paths taken and not taken, possibilities seized or lost.

Jennifer Moses, Who Is Afraid of Red Yellow Blue Orange Green and Black

Jennifer Moses, Who is Afraid of Red Yellow Blue Orange Green and Black , Oil on wood Panel, 12 x 9 inches, 2013.

Jennifer Moses, Bandelier Phantasmagoria

Jennifer Moses, Bandelier Phantasmagoria, Oil on wood panel, 22 x 23 inches, 2013.

Jennifer Moses, Moonrise

Jennifer Moses, Moonrise, Oil on panel, 12 x 12 inches, 2013.


February 5 - March 2, 2014
First Friday Opening Reception:
Friday, February 7, 2014, 5:00-7:30 pm

Jeffrey Hull: GUMBO VARIATIONS, Paintings and Drawings

Fiery colors and complex patterns, concrete-hard, these new paintings are a collection of unconscious gestures that form heavily textured surfaces, frosted with paint tossed and driven by a raging sea of life. The show is a Gumbo, suggestive of earthly places that swim in image pools. Gumbo refers to that famous dish that has many interpretations. What makes a Gumbo the dish or a painting? Wide swatches of dark color are slashed by bolts of intense hue that hang on the surface like a street of sagging clotheslines or a city dump of abstracted forms and shapes, crunched and collapsed. The paint application is very physical, slaps of color and slabs of paint applied with kitchen tools. Hair combs make crisscrossed lines. Lumps of paint sit on glass smooth surfaces. The impression is that these paintings are made with shovels not brushes. Look at it or eat it.

Jeff Hull, April in Paris

Jeffrey Hull, April in Paris, Oil on Canvas , 13 x 18 inches.


February 5 - March 2, 2014
First Friday Opening Reception:
Friday, February 7, 2014, 5:00-7:30 pm

Kathleen Gerdon Archer: The Door Behind Us

These photographic images reference the vanitas painting style in an attempt to create a contemporary momento mori.

The series is titled "Ubi Sunt", translated as "where are" and describes a type of poetry that evokes a sense of nostalgia, transience and the fleeting nature of life.

Kathleen Gerdon Archer, Fields of France

Kathleen Gerdon Archer, Fields of France, Digital Photograph mounted on sintra under plexiglas , 24 x 36 inches, 2013.


January 2 - February 2, 2014
First Friday Opening:
January 10, 2014, 5:30-7:30 pm
Artist's Reception: Friday, January 24, 2014 5:30-7:30 pm

Luanne E Witkowski: IV

"Working intuitively to create abstract contemplative pieces rooted in & extracted from landscape & experience, this work is a process-driven visual and tangible response to the experiences of creating and documenting environmental installations. Traditional and nontraditional media are used to mingle the place in the piece & piece in the place to capture a perceptual & spiritual relationship as locus for recognition of & solace for the self. This traditional American approach to the identification of the individual with landscape is enlarged by a desire to discover & contact the particular indwelling essence or energy of a particular place."

Luanne E Witkowski is an American Artist working in a wide range of media and reflective & social practice, mainly in Boston & Wellfleet, Massachusetts with works in collections throughout the United States and abroad. She is a member of the Kingston Gallery, Boston; represented by Hutson Gallery and AMP Gallery both in Provincetown, MA. She exhibits regularly and produces environmental and site-specific installations. Luanne is a member of several artist organizations including the United South End Artists, Mission Hill Artist Collective, & the Provincetown Art Association & Museum.

Her Basic Training for Artists and Creative People Workshops (Healthy Artist/Healthy Studio) are offered in collaboration with public and private institutions and individual consultation.

In addition to her studio practice, she is the Communication Design Studio Manager and co-designer and faculty leader of the international travel course Nepal: Art in Social Practice at Massachusetts College of Art and Design; she teaches Creative Thinking in the Critical & Creative Thinking (CCT) graduate program at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, and is an internet entrepreneur and business owner.

Honors include: Commonwealth of Massachusetts Lifetime Achievement in Art & Commerce Commendation.

Luanne E Witkowski, BlueGranite

Luanne E Witkowski, BlueGranite , Mixed media on paper , 15" x 11" 2013.

Luanne E Witkowski, Swept

Luanne E Witkowski, Swept , Mixed media on paper , 15" x 11" 2013.

Luanne E Witkowski, Vertical Space

Luanne E Witkowski, Vertical Space , Mixed media on paper , 15" x 11" 2013.


January 2 - February 2, 2014
First Friday Opening:
January 10, 2014, 5:30-7:30 pm
Artist's Reception: Friday, January 24, 2014 5:30-7:30 pm

MARY MEAD - Heads: New Prints

Mary Mead will be exhibiting new prints of varying scale from an on-going series titled Heads. This exhibition will include large scale prints, 40" x 72", recently completed at Gravity Experimental Print Shop in North Adams, MA with Master Printer Brandon Graving. Graving and Mead made the connection and decision to work together through Facebook where both are part of a large network of artists who share work, ideas, exhibitions and also in Mead's case, photos of her beloved Pug.

The process of woodcut intaglio involves drawing on a sheet of luan with a Dremmel tool. The plate is sanded and shellaced and printed both as an intaglio plate and a relief plate.

Mead is Assistant Professor at Colby-Sawyer College in New London, NH, where she teaches printmaking. Her work is included in the Boston Printmaker's 2013 North American Print Biennial at Boston University. Mead is also a member of the Boston Printmakers Society.

Mary Mead

Mary Mead, From the "Head" Series, Woodcut intaglio monoprint, 30 x 22 inches, 2013.


January 2 - February 2, 2014
First Friday Opening:
January 10, 2014, 5:30-7:30 pm
Artist's Reception: Friday, January 24, 2014 5:30-7:30 pm

Susan Alport: Give/Take

This exhibit is an expansion of work developed in September, 2013, for the Kingston Members Show conceived and curated by Deborah Davidson on the theme "Gifted", exploring the cultural position of the artist as gift giver/maker, based on Lewis Hyde's book on this subject.

Alport's work explores another side of this relationship: artists as givers/takers in their individual quests for the exact means to express what they want and need to say. Often that comes only through using the works and means of others to create their own, an act of involuntary giving by one artist, and an unabashed "take" by the other.

Susan Alport, Shadow Shots

Susan Alport, Shadow Shots, 35 mm film prints in vintage album sleeves, Each 10.25 X 11.50 inches, 2012.